Auction Watch #82


The first auction, MATTEL M.U.S.C.L.E. Men lot One 10 pack, Ten mint 4 packs, one all pink & bonus, comes from one of the founding fathers of M.U.S.C.L.E. collecting – Darrin Vindiola.

He literally had the first M.U.S.C.L.E. website. Darrin has largely stepped away from collecting M.U.S.C.L.E. figures. His focus has shifted to his other blog, Dad’s Dish Retro Blog which is always an enjoyable read. Darrin’s voice has always been distinctive, warm, and friendly.

Besides Darrin being a great guy, collectors can take great comfort in knowing they will be receiving items in wonderful condition. It would not be surprising to sell this beautiful lot sell for a little bit more than expected given its provenance.

The final price for this auction will be $91.50.

The second auction, M.U.S.C.L.E. custom Satan Cross, springboards collectors into the present. It features a custom Satan Cross figure created by “halfaway” and cast by Alec (Muscle Things). This pair has collaborated on several figures and the design and construction is always exquisite. The most fascinating part is the similarity in the figure’s texture to authentic M.U.S.C.L.E. figures. It is as close as any collector would ever want a customizer to come. Close enough to be eerily similar, but not so close that it could be confused for authentic.

It is also wonderful to see a custom M.U.S.C.L.E. figure being sold at a low entry price point. Not only does this encourage bidding, but it may help to create new custom M.U.S.C.L.E. collectors.

The final prices of “halfaway” and Alec’s customs have historically been quite varied. They have been anywhere from about $10 to nearly $90. Given the quality of the figure and the popularity of Satan Cross it wouldn’t be surprising to see this have a high final price. However, the Dark Blue color is the great variable in this auction – buyers will likely love it or hate it. The final price of the second auction will be $26.50.

The last six auctions are shared collectively because it seems to be the week of M.U.S.C.L.E. auctions with more than 50 figures. All of these auctions run from large to pretty darn huge. They all seem to have fair opening bids and shipping prices. It will be interesting to see if a flood of large auctions help or hurt the final price of each auction.


Follow-Up: The first auction sold for $120.77, which was $29.27 more than the predicted price of $91.50.

1st Auction
Final Screen Shot


The second auction sold for $16.50, which was $10 less than the predicted price of $26.50.

2nd Auction
Final Screen Shot


The remaining auctions did not have predicted final prices. However, the final screen shots were still saved. It is interesting to note that the per-figure prices of the auctions ranged from $0.35 to $0.83. The $0.83 was a bit of an outlier because it had a large Japanese Sunshine keshi figure. Removing that auction from the group of six put the average per-figure price of the auctions at $0.48.

56 Figure Lot
Final Screen Shot

60 Figure Lot
Final Screen Shot

67 Figure Lot
Final Screen Shot

135 Figure Lot
Final Screen Shot

176 Figure Lot
Final Screen Shot

324 Figure Lot
Final Screen Shot

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  1. #1 by Leitmotiv on October 12th, 2011

    I don’t understand it when you say the final price of an auction will be such and such, but the auctions haven’t ended yet.

  2. #2 by Chad Perry on October 12th, 2011

    It’s predictive. The estimations are meant to be a fun and interesting part of Auction Watch.

    Then all of the Auction Watches are updated and an end of the year review is done (2009 and 2010).

  3. #3 by Leitmotiv on October 12th, 2011

    Okay… well you can imagine my confusion when you don’t mention it’s predictive, but you do say the “final price.” I would recommend a different method.

  4. #4 by Chad Perry on October 13th, 2011

    While I’m always open to constructive criticism, I don’t know how much more clear I could make it. I’ve done it for over 80 weeks without any problems – aside from initial concern by some collectors that making a prediction about price had a negative impact on auctions.

    Plus the Auction Watch write-ups usually follow the same pattern. An identification of issues that may impact the final price and then offering a final price – nearly always stated, “The final price of the auction will be …”

    The entire sentence is clearly expressing a future tense.

  5. #5 by Ridureyu on October 13th, 2011

    Chad has a time machine. He let me use it once, but I failed at shooting Hitler.

  6. #6 by Leitmotiv on October 14th, 2011

    Well sure, part of the sentence may be future tense, but the sentence is also at odds with itself by stating that there’s a final price (past tense). It’s conflicted. I’ve read passages that are future tense, but aren’t trying to be predictive, but instead more artsy or, heh.. British.

    Why are you trying to predict the auctions?

  7. #7 by Chad Perry on October 14th, 2011

    Chad Perry :

    It’s predictive. The estimations are meant to be a fun and interesting part of Auction Watch.

    Then all of the Auction Watches are updated and an end of the year review is done (2009 and 2010).

    Let’s just agree to disagree.

  8. #8 by Darrin on October 14th, 2011

    Thanks for your kind words brother. I’m thinning out my collections all the way across the board, and this is the M.U.S.C.L.E. stuff that’s been sitting in a box for a couple years. It’s either thinning out the collections, or risk becoming a hoarder. LOL
    Take Care,
    Darrin

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