The 10-Pack


The 10-pack is arguably the most iconic of the M.U.S.C.L.E. packaging. It’s retail price seemed to greatly fluctuate between the 4- and 28-packs, usually landing near three dollars. The 10-pack allowed for the ten figures inside to somewhat visible, but remain largely mysterious. A clever child was able to decipher some of the figures, or at least have a better chance of not buying figures they already owned.

10-Pack with a #46

10-Pack with a #125

10-Pack with a #157


Like the 4-pack, the 10-pack was available in three different figure combinations. The first release was the all Flesh package.

The second was a mix of colors and Flesh figures. Unlike the 4-pack, the 10-pack’s 50/50 split was not limited to just purple, red, and blue figures. The 10-pack seemed to have any of the colors in its 50/50 split packs.

The final mix of figures removed all the Flesh figures and included only colors.

Flesh 10-Pack
Front

Flesh 10-Pack
Side

50/50 10-Pack
Front

50/50 10-Pack
Side

Color 10-Pack
Front

Color 10-Pack
Side


Like the 4-Pack, the can and shrink-wrap did not change over its two years of release. However, there was one variation – an uncommon French-Canadian version of the 10-pack. The can features everything in both English and French. This is the only legitimate variation to the 10-pack.

Color 10-Pack
French-Canadian 1

Color 10-Pack
French-Canadian 2

Color 10-Pack
French-Canadian 3

Color 10-Pack
French-Canadian 4

English/French-Canadian
Comparison 1

English/French-Canadian
Comparison 2


English/French-Canadian
Comparison 3

English/French-Canadian
Comparison 4


From Naochin's Website

Original Can


One of the most interesting aspects of the 10-pack can is its origins. In 2003 a LRG message board user named, Soupie, discovered that the 10-packs cans came from a Play-Doh-like Kinnikuman product from Bandai.

This 1984 set, which predates M.U.S.C.L.E., came with the clay presser, four figure molds, and 3 globs of clay. The three globs of clay were housed in a clear plastic garbage can. This is the can that would be used for Mattel’s M.U.S.C.L.E. 10-pack.

Several years later, in 2007, some similar looking garbage cans started to appear. They were soon identified as cans from Bandai products: Canfull of Monsters and Monster Toss. Both of these sets predate the Clay Presser with respective release dates of 1979 and 1981. For more information on these lines, please read Canfull of Monsters/Monster Toss at Toypedia.com

Green Can

Green Can

Red Can

Red Can

Yellow Can

Yellow Can

Canfull of Monsters vs. M.U.S.C.L.E.

Canfull of Monsters vs. M.U.S.C.L.E.

Side Comparison

Side Comparison

Bottom Comparison

Bottom Comparison


Images provided by: Toypedia


It is unknown if Bandai suggested the garbage can or if Mattel requested the garbage can.

For further information about the 10-Pack, please read the 10-Pack Display Case information.

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  1. #1 by Foxman on December 4th, 2012

    Mattel apparently had a “Slime” can in 1978. http://pinterest.com/lisammitchell/children-s-flashbacks/

  2. #2 by Chad Perry on December 5th, 2012

    That is true, but I’m not sure what you are trying to add or suggest. Was your post meant to be an allusion to the 10-Pack Display Case?

    The Mattel can, from 1978, looks nothing like the 10-pack.

    The 10-pack looks exactly like the Bandai garbage can – and Bandai manufactured the M.U.S.C.L.E. toys.

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